The Temple of Air: Stories

The Temple of Air Stories Linking the lives and tales of a place and its people through tragedy and consequence blind faith and redemption this collection of finely tuned short stories spans three decades to present a portra

  • Title: The Temple of Air: Stories
  • Author: Patricia Ann McNair
  • ISBN: 9780615434636
  • Page: 128
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Temple of Air: Stories

    Linking the lives and tales of a place and its people through tragedy and consequence, blind faith and redemption, this collection of finely tuned short stories spans three decades to present a portrait of working class Americans From babysitter and bus ticket salesman to construction worker and cult leader, the residents of New Hope whose lives intersect after a tragicLinking the lives and tales of a place and its people through tragedy and consequence, blind faith and redemption, this collection of finely tuned short stories spans three decades to present a portrait of working class Americans From babysitter and bus ticket salesman to construction worker and cult leader, the residents of New Hope whose lives intersect after a tragic accident during a summer carnival chase dreams and suffer disappointment against the subtle backdrop of a Midwestern landscape The stories are unapologetic yet magical, bringing to life the daily struggle under the weight of war, natural disaster, illness, grief, and greed, even as the residents enjoy the comforts of solace, friendship, sex, love, ice cream, and the comics found wrapped around bubblegum.

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      Posted by:Patricia Ann McNair
      Published :2019-01-06T14:41:44+00:00

    One thought on “The Temple of Air: Stories

    1. James Warner

      McNair’s interest is in the qualities we lack, the injustices we can’t get over, and the ways our pasts weigh us down. Her characters cling to their secrets, weather cruel disappointments, and fail to soar above their lives’ catastrophes. Interconnecting and reinforcing each other, her stories admirably evoke Midwestern longing -- a kind of small-town pain of very heavy people trying to levitate – and form an intricate portrait of a community of loners.

    2. Emily Schultze

      This is a book that when I finished reading it, I immediately knew that I would read it again. And again. The stories are those that stick with you, not just because of their plots, but because of the incredibly strong voice that accompanies them. The writing of this book exceeds being just black type on a white page. It is truly a whisper in your head, a projector playing out the scenes so vividly before you that you forget entirely that you are actually reading. At least that's how it went for [...]

    3. Jennifer

      I had been waiting a long time to get my hands on this book, which I had to interlibrary loan from the west coast (which is surprising, as it's written by a Chicago author). Having gone to Columbia College to major in Fiction Writing, I was excited to see what Patty McNair (a professor there) had written. This book is a compilation of short stories that tie together loosely, interweaving small (yet deceptively important) moments in the lives of everyone from adult twins on the run, to an icecrea [...]

    4. Michael Downs

      The way these stories link lives in the fictional midwestern town of New Hope is only part of the pleasure this book will give its readers. McNair is expert at exploring the moments that matter. She reveals her characters at their most vulnerable and dramatic (leaving a lover, exploring sex after a mastectomy, struggling to understand an accidental death), and she never turns away from the harsh realities. But she also sees all those moments that make up the texture of our lives and help us surv [...]

    5. Lucricia

      Her characters are not nice, well rounded people who are easy to like. Their stories aren't always easy to read. They are rough with jagged edges, hard to hold, unapologetic and very real. But that's what makes me love them so much. The stories are so vivid in the telling. I felt pulled into their world and isn't that what superb writing does? Pulls you out of your existence for a time and completely immerses you in the character's world? Patricia McNair's stories are just that good.

    6. Tom Mula

      Terrific. Moving, awe-ful, sad, sexy, and hilarious. ("The Twin" made me giggle like a schoolgirl--it's real Charles Addams stuff!) I grew up in Central Illinois, and it felt like home in the summertime--the dusty dark side of the coin to Bradbury's Dandelion Wine; a little bit Bastard out of Minnesota, a little bit Flannery O'Connor's relentless unforgiving search for grace.

    7. Rachel Ann

      Brutal in its honesty, stunning in it's insight, merciless in it's impact. This book will leave you in tears, nodding in sympathy and understanding, even if you've never been in a similar situation. McNair's genius is in her ability to make you feel, whether you want to or not. I was quite impressed, actually.

    8. Ben

      What it means to live, and mostly cope, with things missing in our lives, hands, parents, children, breasts, love, that are at times violently taken from us, and other times more subtly so.More - bentanzer/2013/11

    9. Ted

      I really enjoyed the stories contained in The Temple of Air, particularly the experiences of the "young people" of New Hope as they navigate a world of adults who may or may not protect and nurture them the way adults should. Many of the stories seem to me to examine how we want life and love to be compared with how life and love really unfold. Like a photograph by Dorothea Lange or an interview by Studs Terkel, the fictional tales in The Temple of Air reveal the danger and disappointment inhere [...]

    10. Jan

      This is one of those books you will want to read and re-read! The stories are astounding! The characters move through their lives, trying to find their way, getting lost and getting stuck, reaching out for what they think will fill the void and not finding it. Yet, for all it says about this human condition that we've all found ourselves in from time to time, there IS hope in New Hope - but Patricia Ann McNair makes you work for it! You won't find nicely tied up stories here. This is a book you [...]

    11. Candice

      I liked the inter-connectedness of the stories, but this book was grim - GRIM. As a former gritty Midwesterner myself, I guess I'm getting too old to welcome more suffering, at least in my literary choices. I actually probably would have related to this more if I were younger. In the interview in the back of the book, the reader's guide, I found it very interesting how many years she would go back and re-work a story. I understand she is an excellent writing teacher.

    12. Kimy

      I won The Temple of Air by Patricia Ann McNair through the Giveaway program. This book is made up of stories that can link together. Some parts of the book were intriging, but many of the stories had more curse words than I prefer. There is also drug use in the book. It was an ok book but I probably will not read it again.

    13. Marisa (The Daily Dosage)

      Oh my! I want to ingest this collection! *sigh* A more coherent review will come but I just want to enjoy the after buzz before dissecting it.

    14. Elaine

      I only read the first chapter (the first story). It was sad & distressing, and concerns (mainly) some youths whom I don't particularly relate to. I'm in no mood for this kind of thing these days.

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