Organizing Genius: The Secrets of Creative Collaboration

Organizing Genius The Secrets of Creative Collaboration Uncovers the elements of creative collaboration by examining six of the century s most extraordinary groups and distill their successful practices into lessons that virtually any organization can lear

  • Title: Organizing Genius: The Secrets of Creative Collaboration
  • Author: Warren G. Bennis Patricia Ward Biederman
  • ISBN: 9780201339895
  • Page: 270
  • Format: Paperback
  • Organizing Genius: The Secrets of Creative Collaboration

    Uncovers the elements of creative collaboration by examining six of the century s most extraordinary groups and distill their successful practices into lessons that virtually any organization can learn and commit to in order to transform its own management into a collaborative and successful group of leaders Paper DLC Organizational effectiveness Case studies.

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      Posted by:Warren G. Bennis Patricia Ward Biederman
      Published :2019-03-17T10:07:11+00:00

    One thought on “Organizing Genius: The Secrets of Creative Collaboration

    1. Natasha

      A book that takes a good, hard look at genius, thus worth exploring. It delivers some interesting observations but isn't a life-changer. Warren Bennis noted similar patterns in the dynamics of several "great groups." His final chapter, "Take Home Notes," pulls these patterns together but was actually the least engaging chapter of the book. It didn't leave me wanting to go out and build my own great group, or even find one. It just felt like, "Hey, some people worth noting have done this great st [...]

    2. Otis Chandler

      A great read for anyone leading or working in a creative team. Delves into the stories of Xerox PARC, Disney, Bill Clinton's election, Black Mountain College, Skunk Works, and The Manhattan Project. Very interesting to read about all these epic creative groups.I'm not sure I learned anything revolutionary in this book, but it did help drive home some ideas that I keep running across. I think the major takeaway of the book is that great groups need a great purpose. If they believe in the purpose, [...]

    3. Barry Davis

      SUBTITLED “THE SECRETS OF CREATIVE COLLABORATION”, BENNIS BEGINS BY TOUTING THE “END OF THE GREAT MAN”, CLAIMING THAT COLLABORATION AND COOPERATION ARE CRITICAL TO SUCCESS, SUPPLANTING THE TRIUMPHANT INDIVIDUAL. tELLING THE STORIES OF SIX GREAT GROUPS FROM A “FLY-ON-THE-WALL” PERSPECTIVE - DISNEY (FULL LENGTH ANIMATED MOVIES), XEROX/PARC AND APPLE (BIRTH OF THE PERSONAL COMPUTER), CLINTON’S ‘92 ELECTION CAMPAIGN, THE SKUNK WORKS (STEALTH FIGHTER, ETC.), BLACK MOUNTAIN COLLEGE (JO [...]

    4. Michael

      Warren Bennis has been writing and working this territory for so long he could write this book in his sleep. Maybe he did, for the amount of slack and the lack of energy in it.His team looked at seven high-powered groups for similarities in process, and wouldn't you know it--he found some! From Disney Studios to the Clinton campaign for President, here are the elements of a successful group, or at least, this kind of group.Because so few groups will be able to attain the level of givens and assu [...]

    5. Heather Maoury

      I found this book very repetitive and semi-interesting. I grasped the concepts after the 1st few chapters. The only reason I continued reading was out of interest of the history of the "Great Groups" themselves. The anecdotes about the Apple Team and the Manhattan Project from a historical perspective were quite interesting. As a Disney fan, I knew most of the stories that were shared in the book about Walt Disney being more of an "idea" guy and not the executor of his vision. This was the same [...]

    6. Aaron Bolin

      Warren Bennis and his colleagues narrate a series of "great group" case studies including Disney, the Manhattan Project, and Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign. The premise behind the book is that great groups share certain characteristics in common that could be replicated to produce other great groups. The book is very well-written, but I started to get bored in the latter chapters. The case studies just weren't that compelling. Overall, I thought the book was a worthwhile read. I would [...]

    7. Amy

      The companies described in this book were all start-ups which brought together incredibly talented and passionate people, and the stories are insightfully told. There are five or six examples (if I remember correctly) of amazing business ventures, some of which became incredible successes (Apple, Skunkworks), and some which were failures (Black Mountain [art] College). This was one of the small handful of valuable books I got from my college education. I found it very interesting and very well w [...]

    8. Derrick Trimble

      The stories that make up the core of this Bennis/Biederman work span twentieth century organizational innovators. The footprint of the leaders and their Great Groups on our business think as well as day-to-day life is encased like a fossilized marker of time. I often wondered while reading how the Great Groups could sustain their creative edge. Each Great Group rose to a call by a leader and delivered their products with total abandon. Picking through the mountain of mental ore of each page, I f [...]

    9. Chris

      The stories in this book make you want to belong to a Great Group - or, if you have been part of a Good or Great Group, brings back memories of a special time. Truly what many would want 'work' to be - fun, focused, really part of the whole, and changing 'something.'For managers or those looking for ways to get teams of very smart and/or very dedicated and/or very focused people to work together, this provides some guidelines about how it really does take all kinds to accomplish big things, and [...]

    10. Devin Partlow

      Really a 3.5, this book does a good job of analyzing specific greats groups for insight into the elements of a great group. The author also does a great job of summarizing the top 15 things you need to make a great group of your own in the end. With that said you have to wonder what came first in the creation of this book, the top 15 things or the selection of great groupsI recommend this book to anyone that wants to do something amazing and is in the process of forming the team to do so.

    11. Curtis

      This was a good book and I've gone back to it many times to re-read a chapter or brush up on a cool factoid. It breaks down some of the countries greatest groups and why they were so great. It reviews the Walt Disney Studios that created Snow White to the Manhattan Project, and many others.

    12. Alyssa Owens

      I would not recommend this book. It has several bad principles in it. I did enjoy a few of his thoughts and principles, but most were very iffy.

    13. Kiersten

      Only good if you're looking for the proof. No real "lessons" structurally laid out, but rather stories of companies/groups etc. that worked together.

    14. Noric Dilanchian

      The final chapter of this book delivers guidance based on the case studies covered by the author. The prior chapters are just preparatory, you almost don't have to read them.

    15. Katherine

      A great look into some of the greatest groups in American history (Disney, PARC, Skunk Works) and what made them tick.

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