Standing Bear is a Person: The True Story of a Native American's Quest for Justice

Standing Bear is a Person The True Story of a Native American s Quest for Justice In Standing Bear and his Indian people the Ponca were forcibly removed from their land in northern Nebraska In defiance Standing Bear sued in U S District Court for the right to return home I

  • Title: Standing Bear is a Person: The True Story of a Native American's Quest for Justice
  • Author: Stephen Dando-Collins
  • ISBN: 9780306813702
  • Page: 246
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Standing Bear is a Person: The True Story of a Native American's Quest for Justice

    In 1877, Standing Bear and his Indian people, the Ponca, were forcibly removed from their land in northern Nebraska In defiance, Standing Bear sued in U.S District Court for the right to return home In a landmark case, the judge, for the first time in U.S history, recognized Native American rights acknowledging that Standing Bear is a person and ruled in favor of StaIn 1877, Standing Bear and his Indian people, the Ponca, were forcibly removed from their land in northern Nebraska In defiance, Standing Bear sued in U.S District Court for the right to return home In a landmark case, the judge, for the first time in U.S history, recognized Native American rights acknowledging that Standing Bear is a person and ruled in favor of Standing Bear Standing Bear Is a Person is the fascinating behind the scenes story of that landmark 1879 court case, and the subsequent reverberations of the judge s ruling across nineteenth century America It is also a story filled with memorable characters typical of the Old West the crusty and wise Indian chief, Standing Bear, the Army Indian fighting general who became a strong Indian supporter, the crusading newspaper editor who championed Standing Bear s cause, and the most beautiful Indian maiden of her time, Bright Eyes, who became Standing Bear s national spokesperson At a time when America was obsessed with winning the West, no matter what, this is an intensely human story and a small victory for compassion It is also the chronicle of an American tragedy Standing Bear won his case, but the court s decision that should have changed everything, in the end, changed very little for America s Indians.

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      Posted by:Stephen Dando-Collins
      Published :2018-012-01T02:27:25+00:00

    One thought on “Standing Bear is a Person: The True Story of a Native American's Quest for Justice

    1. Stew

      I really wanted to WRITE this book rather than read it. I thought the story of Standing Bear and his quest for justice would make a great narrative. Dee Brown wrote a chapter on the case in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, but it was a story that needed fleshing out.Gen. Crook, Thomas Tibbles and the Omaha Indian Bright Eyes are all fascinating characters on their own, and their stories converge in one of the most important legal cases in Native American history.I was at first disappointed to find [...]

    2. Mateo

      You know, the history of relations between Indians and Americans (if that's the way to put it) is so fraught with horrible stories of cruelty, greed, mendacity, and stupidity that it feels almost like having brunch with Newt Gingrich. When you come across a genuinely heartwarming story in which white people--well, some white people--don't act like savages, and even act with compassion and moral bravery, you latch onto it. And pray James Cameron and Kevin Costner don't make a movie about it. Not [...]

    3. Stephen

      I selected this popular history of an important 1879 lawsuit as the text for the Law and Literature class I teach for the Annual Judicial Conference in Washington State. It describes the shameful dealings of the United States with the Ponca Indian Tribe and one of its leaders, Standing Bear. It involves a writ of habeas corpus brought to test the dispossession of Standing Bear's clan from their ancestral land and the United States' defense to the writ that Standing Bear was not a "person" to who [...]

    4. Catherine Richmond

      This author has an unusual style. He uses "would have been" or "must have been" to fill in the blanks of this history.

    5. Kaci

      Dando-Collins tells his story well, however, as other reviewers have pointed out, much of his prose is based on unsubstantiated speculation which makes it hard to take anything the author writes as serious history. Many critical moments in his narrative have absolutely zero citations.For example, Indian Agent E. A. Howard appears to be a victim (almost to the point of defamation) of the author's assumptions. Erroneously identified as "Inspector Howard" throughout the entire work, Dando-Collins r [...]

    6. Chrystal Mars-Baker

      this is a good read if you are interested in the journey of the native american toward his rights to protect his way of life in the early U.S. I found this book to be very good reading. it left me with mixed emotions about his quest and how a lawyer using the legal system in an effort to help, actually may have done more damage in retrospect. however, the good thing was that it put american indian citizenship on the map. highly recommend this book. old books often discolored early american histo [...]

    7. Jamie

      So much conjecture! I have no doubt that the historical facts were presented accurately, but there were so many instances of "would have" that I put down the book with no intention of finishing many times. Tibble "would have" been exhausted; Bright Eyes "would have" felt shy. Nonetheless, I finished. I'm glad to know the story, but I'm even more glad to be done with this book.

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