The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City

The Seattle Street Smart Naturalist Field Notes from the City Back to the city or back to nature Seattle author David Williams shows us how we can get the best of both Botany and bugs geology and geese and creeks and crows living in a major city doesn t have

  • Title: The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City
  • Author: David B. Williams
  • ISBN: 9781558688599
  • Page: 324
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City

    Back to the city, or back to nature Seattle author David Williams shows us how we can get the best of both Botany and bugs, geology and geese, and creeks and crows living in a major city doesn t have to separate us from the natural world Stepping away from a guidebook format, Williams presents the reader with a series of essays and maps that weave personal musings, bitBack to the city, or back to nature Seattle author David Williams shows us how we can get the best of both Botany and bugs, geology and geese, and creeks and crows living in a major city doesn t have to separate us from the natural world Stepping away from a guidebook format, Williams presents the reader with a series of essays and maps that weave personal musings, bits of humor, natural history observations, and scientific data into a multi textured perspective of life in the city descriptions of his journeys as a naturalist in an urban landscape Williams addresses questions that an observant person asks in an urban environment What did Seattle look like before Europeans got here How does the area s geologic past affect us Why have some animals thrived and other languished How are we affected by the species with whom we share the urban environment and how do we affect them This book captures all of the distinctive flavors of the Emerald City, urban and natural.

    • ✓ The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ David B. Williams
      324 David B. Williams
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ David B. Williams
      Posted by:David B. Williams
      Published :2018-08-22T08:20:48+00:00

    One thought on “The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist: Field Notes from the City

    1. Catonthepillow

      Nice reading to try looking for nature in Seattle city. I feel closer to nature after reading this book.

    2. Phillip

      Enjoyable accessible well written informative diverse vignettes on topics pertaining to Nature in the city. Concentration on appreciation of common sights like geese eagles marble and brings to them a fine eye examination.

    3. Mark

      I enjoyed this book, despite knowing nothing of Seattle and never having visited. But Williams' attitude is endearing and universally applicable if you choose to adopt it. He is a geologist and had a different emphasis on his read of the world around him as a result, which was interesting and fun, even though the time scales of geology give me a little trouble getting engaged with it. Williams also has a good reply to the argument that preference for native plants is ideology rather than science [...]

    4. Lina

      i loved this book. each night i picked it up and felt like i was escaping into this magical land but wait a minute-all of these wonders are right in my back yard, at times literally! i feel like this book is an essential read for any pacific northwester. the info is presented in an entertaining easy to understand manner and I dig david's sense of humor. both professionally as someone in the environmental restoration field and personally as someone who loves adventures in the city and struggling [...]

    5. Jennie

      Interesting read about Seattle's natural history. Author has a quirky/geeky sense of humor, which at times is charming but can get old. I found most interesting the chapters in which he moves around the city--following Thornton Creek, searching for Garry oaks, looking for fossils on the buildings of downtown, and so on. Warning: I didn't know whether to laugh or cry while reading the section on Seattle's faults. The description of what we're in for in the "big one" is so absurdly horrifying ther [...]

    6. Johnny G

      I've been an armchair birdwatcher since I was a kid. Okay, armchair isn't the right word for it. I don't go out in search of them, but when I'm out, I look for 'em and watch 'em. And this book addresses Seattle's many natural wonders that I cross paths with on a daily basis. The stones from the buildings in Pioneer Square, the path of Piper's Creek, the bugs I step on accidentally. It's all there. And then he goes back to birds, and I'm won over. Yeah, David.

    7. Jen

      Always cool to read about a place where you live. The author does a great job at making me want to look twice at everyday places like the rocks in the downtown bus tunnels or little creeks running through the neighborhood. So far, I have most enjoyed the chapter on that creek (Meadowbrook?) - and am looking forward to visiting the pond he described - and the chapter describing Seattle's vegetation before there was a city here.

    8. Wesley Andrews

      I thoroughly enjoyed it!! It was missing maps, however. So many times I wanted an easy reference to exactly where he was writing about. The notes are insightful and they do reference a page number, but they would have been easier to read had there been precise references in the text - a small number at the end of a paragraph. I recommend this to anyone who wants to see Seattle with new eyes.

    9. Ann

      different cover on my copyThe EaglesThe FaultThe PlantsThe Creek [i.e. Thornton Creek]The Stone [building stone]The GeeseThe BugsThe WeatherThe Hills [the seven?]The InvadersThe Water [the city's supply]The Crows

    10. Erica

      David Williams covers several areas of nature that he encounters regularly in an urban setting (Seattle), including different types of birds, insects, weather, water and stone. It made me look at the city that is now my home in a whole new way.

    11. Jenni Pertuset

      I expected this to be more about empowering the reader as observer of and participant in urban nature and less about the author. I suppose I should have paid more attention to the subtitle.

    12. Sarah Sliva

      Good read. A little dry at times, but a bit scary at others (see: the chapter on tectonic plates). Inspired me to learn a bit more about the species of flora/fauna in this area that I now call home.

    13. Kelda

      We need one of these books for every town! Awesome! Natural history essays from walking around and checking out all sorts of cool stuff in Seattle's neighborhoods.

    14. Jim Rymsza

      Super book about local geography, watersheds and species. Everything (almost everything) you ever wanted to know about the wilds of Seattle.

    15. Manuel

      Some chapters are neat, some are duds. I loved the urban crows chapter. The one about fossils in the sandstone in skyscrapers, zzzzzzzzz.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *