Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance

Peckinpah An Ultraviolent Romance Life in Dreamfield Indiana is a daily harangue of pigs cornfields pigs fast food joints pigs Dollar Stores motorcycles pigs and good old fashioned Amerikan redneckery The decidedly estranged

  • Title: Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance
  • Author: D. Harlan Wilson
  • ISBN: 9781935738404
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Paperback
  • Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance

    Life in Dreamfield, Indiana, is a daily harangue of pigs, cornfields, pigs, fast food joints, pigs, Dollar Stores, motorcycles, pigs, and good old fashioned Amerikan redneckery The decidedly estranged yet complacent occupants of this proverbial smalltown go about their business like geriatrics in a casino until their business is interrupted by a sinister gang of outsideLife in Dreamfield, Indiana, is a daily harangue of pigs, cornfields, pigs, fast food joints, pigs, Dollar Stores, motorcycles, pigs, and good old fashioned Amerikan redneckery The decidedly estranged yet complacent occupants of this proverbial smalltown go about their business like geriatrics in a casino until their business is interrupted by a sinister gang of outsiders Angry, slick talking, and ultraviolent to the core, Samson Thataway and the Fuming Garcias commit art for art s sake in the form of hideous, unmotivated serial killings When an unsuspecting everyman s wife is murdered by the throng, it is up to Felix Soandso to avenge her death and return Dreamfield to its natural state of absurdity.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance | by ☆ D. Harlan Wilson
      335 D. Harlan Wilson
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance | by ☆ D. Harlan Wilson
      Posted by:D. Harlan Wilson
      Published :2019-03-20T22:50:40+00:00

    One thought on “Peckinpah: An Ultraviolent Romance

    1. Dan Schwent

      When a psychopath named Samson Thataway and his gang, the Fuming Garcias, ride into Dreamfield, Indiana, it means trouble for the small town. During an orgy of rape and murder, they made two mistakes: they raped and murdered Felix Soandso's wife, and they left Felix alivePeckinpah is an absurdist tribute to the films of Sam Peckinpah. While my summary makes it seem like a fairly standard revenge tale, it's not. It's so weird that even though it was less than 110 pages, I couldn't have taken much [...]

    2. Anthony Chavez

      I just don't know what to think after this. An unusual book, for sure! An homage/mock homage to legendary director Sam Peckinpah who directed ultraviolent movies such as: The Wild Bunch, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, Ride the High Country, The Ballad of Cable Hogue, etc. It's hard for me to say whether I truly liked it or not. The book is structured in jagged bits and pieces, and it covers a whole lot; however, only a little more than half of the chapters actually involve the story and characte [...]

    3. J. Osborne

      In 1994 Alan Moore wrote a short story about a woman named Maureen Cooper, a bartender who slowly comes to realize she exists only as a character on a popular TV soap. The story was dense, verbose, brilliant metafiction, blending the story of Maureen with that of the actress who played her (who was herself not who she seemed) with a vicious polemic on television and its effects on society. It was called “Light of Thy Countenance” and there are two reasons I bring it up: first, because I feel [...]

    4. David Barbee

      D Harlan Wilson’s Peckinpah is one of his best works, and that’s saying a lot. Wilson takes his own flare for high-minded weirdness and jacks it up a billion notches. The book is structured in jagged bits and pieces, and it covers a wide variety of topics. Only about half of the chapters involve the actual story and characters. The rest of Peckinpah includes theories on the nature of ultraviolence and short essays about Sam Peckinpah himself. It can be daunting if you don’t know what you [...]

    5. Nick Cato

      Wilson's surreal view of a midwestern town called Dreamfield features the author's trademark prose which goes from violent to hysterical to bizarre--sometimes within the same sentence (see chapter11) all the while leaving behind witty commentary and observances on the rural lifestyle.Inbetween the strangely-developing story, we're exposed to "Theories of Ultraviolence," one chapter which sheds a little light on the fascination with director Sam Peckinpah (hence the book's title and inspiration). [...]

    6. D.

      "A bludgeoning celluloid rush of language and ideas served from an action-painter's bucket of fluorescent spatter, D. Harlan Wilson's Peckinpah is an incendiary gem and very probably the most extraordinary new novel you will read this year." ALAN MOORE, author of Watchmen, V for Vendetta, From Hell and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen"D. Harlan Wilson's latest romp of a book, Peckinpah: An Ultravoilent Romance, proves that Wilson is either a genius or a madman, in all likelihood a crazed hy [...]

    7. Stephen Theaker

      Bad, strange people come to an American town and start killing people in lots of little chapters.An unusual book! It's impossible for me to say whether it's good or not; I've read nothing similar to judge it against. By the end it made a kind of sense, but pictures would have helped; it was rather like reading a transcript of a Grant Morrison comic like The Filth.Like the Rhys Hughes book I've been reading recently (The Smell of Telescopes), this is a book where every word counts - it's more lik [...]

    8. R.A. Harris

      This book sits neatly in between Dr. Identity and Codename Prague - two of Wilson's novel length works. I can see the themes in both books being examined and played with in this work. That is in no way a critical statement, I happen to find Wilson's work refreshing.This story doesn't even run like a normal story, half of it is just setting the scene, the second half kind of follows a narrative, but with many tangents along the way.I think Wilson wanted to say that he likes Sam Peckinpah, but cou [...]

    9. S.T. Cartledge

      After Blankety Blank, I had to read more of this guy, just to be sure his brilliance wasn’t a one-off thing. I’m ashamed to admit I haven’t yet seen a Sam Peckinpah film, as much as I want to. However, I could still make enough sense of the book without being overly familiar with his work. The book is short. The chapters are short. And while it doesn’t feel as intricate or as clever as Blankety Blank, it’s still a fantastic book. It’s filled with scenes that are at times ultraviolent [...]

    10. Dustin Reade

      this is one of those books that makes you redefine the way you read. The story is interspersed with facts about the films of Sam Peckinpah, and laid out like scene descriptions which explode with violence and some truly arresting prose. D. Wilson's voice is unique, and this book really shows you what he can do, which is quite a bit. The type of book that kicks you in the teeth--in a good way.

    11. Garrett Cook

      Find out just why and how much I loved this in the next issue of Bust Down the Door and Eat All the Chickens.

    12. Vincenzo Bilof

      Filmstrip inserted into the projector of the subconscious, the raw violence of a land where law has been murdered for the sake of art; “Peckinpah” is a beautiful Leone-Tarantino hybrid that might be a glimpse into the lingering fantasies—or nightmares—of artistic vision desensitized and transfigured by shades of blood in the glare of a rising sun. The “philosophy” of ultraviolence is more about the poetry of ultraviolence—the aesthetics of prose and chaos swirling through sentences [...]

    13. Tally Song

      Chaos, GOre, BLOod, Guts, small town truth I understand but yet I am lost. I think to understand this book and say that it makes complete sense is an insult. I think the truth is supposed to be felt from the images that assault your mind at a blinding rapid speed. I think small towns can hide the violence, the crime, the ugliness of human nature by ignoring the elephant in the room, attending church, and joining the country club to sip top shelf whiskey while thinking about your golf buddie's wi [...]

    14. kcb

      He's easily one of my favorite authors, but I always feel like I've survived a Psychic War after reading one of D. Harlan's books. They are exhausting, but good for the [mental:] economy. Peckinpah plays out like the manifestation of the collective conscious of the Amerikan Midwest if it were, at times, being raped by the collective unconscious of the same region after absorbing and integrating the mind of a man who is good with words. If you've seen Frank Booth's intro in Blue Velvet, and thoug [...]

    15. Sara

      I really would have enjoyed this in my early-mid twenties, but I guess I am just boring in my old age. It was all a bit much for me. But it did read well, it never stalled. It was very visual and easy to picture and picture the characters and the settings. It was pretty in your face and brutal. It wasn't boring or bad, I guess the part of ultraviolence in the title should have clued me in. Not for me, but I do admit it was very well written. So if you want something edgy and in your face, this i [...]

    16. Kt

      I'll be honest and say I don't know what the hell was going on 100%, but I loved reading this! The shorter, choppier sentences mixed with the buckets of imagery and gore were beautifully perfect and reminded me of the cinematography in Natural Born Killers. Now I'll be seeking out more by D. Harlan Wilson, and there appears to thankfully be plenty to choose from.

    17. Chris Bowsman

      Incredible. The only thing keeping me from being very sad that I'm finished with this book is knowing there are a bunch more of his books I haven't read yet.

    18. Nicole Cushing

      Deliciously irreal take on life in the midwest U.S. Don't be put off by the "ultraviolence" reference -- this is a must-read for fans of Bizarro/surreal/irreal texts.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *