Saint Therese of Lisieux

Saint Therese of Lisieux Saint Th r se of Lisieux largely unknown when she died in a Carmelite convent at the age of twenty four became through her posthumously published autobiography one of the world s most influential re

  • Title: Saint Therese of Lisieux
  • Author: Kathryn Harrison
  • ISBN: 9780670031481
  • Page: 223
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Saint Therese of Lisieux

    Saint Th r se of Lisieux, largely unknown when she died in a Carmelite convent at the age of twenty four, became through her posthumously published autobiography one of the world s most influential religious figures In Saint Th r se of Lisieux, bestselling novelist and memoirist Kathryn Harrison, whose depictions of women have been called powerful The New York Times BoSaint Th r se of Lisieux, largely unknown when she died in a Carmelite convent at the age of twenty four, became through her posthumously published autobiography one of the world s most influential religious figures In Saint Th r se of Lisieux, bestselling novelist and memoirist Kathryn Harrison, whose depictions of women have been called powerful The New York Times Book Review and luminously intelligent The Boston Sunday Globe , brings to the saint s life her storytelling gift and deep insight as she reveals the hopes and fears of the young girl behind the religious icon Saint Th r se of Lisieux shows us the pampered daughter of successful and deeply religious tradespeople who through a personal appeal to the pope entered a convent at the early age of fifteen There, Th r se embraced sacrifice and self renunciation in a single minded pursuit of the nothingness she felt would bring her closer to God With feeling, Harrison shows us the sensitive four year old whose mother s death haunted her forever and contributed to the ascetic spirituality that strengthened her to embrace even the deadly throes of tuberculosis Tellingly placed in the context of late nineteenth century French social and religious practices, this is a powerful story of a life lived with enormous passion and a searing, triumphant voyage of the spirit.

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      Published :2018-09-15T08:36:29+00:00

    One thought on “Saint Therese of Lisieux

    1. Patrick

      An interesting biography of the life of a young middle-class French woman who died of tuberculosis in 1897 at age 24 and became a Saint of the Catholic Church less than three decades later (that's pretty fast for the Catholics).It's an interesting book because the author, Kathryn Harrison, does a good job of balancing the presentation of the facts and impressions of Therese Martin's life (as depicted in Therese's own writings and those of her family and her religious order) with the modern biogr [...]

    2. Kasey Jueds

      I haven't cared for the Kathryn Harrison novels I've tried to read, but I was happily surprised and intrigued by this book--intelligently and thoughtfully written and researched, provocative, sad, and moving. I also didn't know much of anything about Therese before I started, and so I feel like I learned a ton--as much about France and French Catholicism of that time as about the saint, who lived a painfully short life (pages and pages of Harrison's book are devoted to Therese's dying of TB--a p [...]

    3. Pam

      My low rating is for the author, not the saint. I felt this devout woman's story was presented with little respect for her faith and holiness. Story of a Soul should give me a much better view of Therese's thoughts and heart. I listened to an audio CD version of this book, but it isn't listed as an option.

    4. Maria

      I would not normally seek out the biography of a saint, but Gretchen Rubin mentions Saint Therese of Lisieux in the Happiness Project as a [non theological] spiritual guru and it piqued my interest.Harrison does a very capable, and indeed objective, job of recounting the events of Therese's life, making great use of the writings of Therese and her sisters as well as records from the canonization hearings. In her early life, Therese strikes me as an unsufferable, spoiled brat whose practice of fa [...]

    5. Christina

      This book chronicles the life of Saint Therese of Lisieux, basically from childhood through death. It is an easy read and fairly enjoyable.In the beginning it seemed that the author did a fine job of keeping personal opinions to herself, and I made a mental appreciative note of that. Further into the book, however, it seemed that the author developed a negative attitude (whereas prior she had expressed no opinion, remember) toward the subject of the book. The author's negative opinion was so pre [...]

    6. Nicholas Whyte

      nwhytevejournal/1449215mlI really didn't know much about St Thérèse of Lisieux, other than that her relics have been the centre of much religious enthusiasm in the various countries to which they have been brought. After reading this book, I don't feel that I know much more than I did. She was one of eight children, the youngest of four surviving sisters, who all became nuns in the same convent (Thérèse having personally petitioned the Pope to be allowed to join at the age of fifteen); she b [...]

    7. Courtney Wallace

      A refreshingly unbiased view of the life of one of France's youngest saints and Catholicism as a whole during the late 19th century. As an agnostic, I respect Harrison's attempt to portray only the facts about Saint Therese's life, from birth to death in intricate detail.A large focus of the work is on Saint Therese's relationships with the people around her. She is sometime seen as a domineering force as well as having excessive pride in her disposition and 'status' with God.I found it pleasant [...]

    8. Rachel

      The author seemed very biased and critical of the Catholic Church, Therese's feelings, and all of society during the time period. I stopped reading when I happened upon this paragraph:"Contemporary readers might balk at the idea of a woman choosing to forsake sexual satisfaction, but in nineteenth century France, what sex life was to be had outside the convent? When the Church was hostile to all earthly pleasures, especially those of the body, there were few sexually liberated married Catholics. [...]

    9. Ryan

      Harrison's point-of-view was unique as she paints a picture of a mentally unhealthy saint from an emotionally dysfunctional family. I don't know that I'd make that assessment if I lived in the late 19th century but it is easy to read her that way from the historical present. Overall it is an engaging meditation on the more bizarre constructs of organized religion and the cultures they create.

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