Black Theology and Black Power

Black Theology and Black Power Newly updated and expanded this classic work is a product of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in America during the s Black Theology Black Power is James H Cone s initial attempt to id

  • Title: Black Theology and Black Power
  • Author: James H. Cone
  • ISBN: 9781570751578
  • Page: 278
  • Format: Paperback
  • Black Theology and Black Power

    Newly updated and expanded, this classic work is a product of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in America during the 1960 s Black Theology Black Power is James H Cone s initial attempt to identify liberation as the heart of the Christian gospel, and blackness as the primary mode of God s presence As he explains in an introduction written for this editionNewly updated and expanded, this classic work is a product of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements in America during the 1960 s Black Theology Black Power is James H Cone s initial attempt to identify liberation as the heart of the Christian gospel, and blackness as the primary mode of God s presence As he explains in an introduction written for this edition, I wanted to speak on behalf of the voiceless black masses in the name of Jesus whose gospel I believed had been greatly distorted by the preaching and theology of white churches.

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    One thought on “Black Theology and Black Power

    1. Angélique (Angel)

      This was one of the most spiritually invigorating and and mentally stimulating books I have read to date. By combining abstract theological and philosophical principles with practical considerations of justice and the experience of oppression, Cone created a theological charge for real justice that I found extremely compelling and relevant. His blunt yet thoughtful approach lifted some of the misplaced guilt I have felt about my own conclusions about white Christianity and racism and deepened my [...]

    2. Erik Graff

      This was assigned reading for Chaplain-professor Dennis Haas' Christian Scriptures class at Grinnell College. Cone, we were informed, was teaching at Union Theological Seminary in New York. His presence and the fact that the much-respected Haas had gone there himself contributed to my decision to attend a conference there and then to apply for admission as a psychology major in their M.Div program. Although I never took one of his courses, theology not being my major, I did hear him lecture in o [...]

    3. Natalie

      I found this book to be extremely meaningful and helpful in understanding the black/white race dynamic in America and how theology factors into the experience of living in the United States as a black person. This book is certainly still relevant, especially in relation to the Black Lives Matter movement, and I think it has a lot of powerful things to say. The message of the book requires a lot of the reader as it should. Cone uses white and black to discuss a lot of difficult realities and conc [...]

    4. Chris

      Upon rereading, I have to say it: This book changed my life. It was, for me, a vehicle of the Holy Spirit's convicting power. I've had my heart touched similarly by other books-- The Challenge of Jesus in high school as I started to understand the Kingdom and the Incarnation, The Moral Vision of the New Testament after 9/11-- but I can understand both those works, by thoughtful evangelicals, as deeper expressions of the faith I already had. This book, more than I recognized at the time, was forc [...]

    5. Eddie Kahler

      I love that Cone's writing is painfully clear. It is so rare to read theologians that are precise, articulate, and to the point. This book, although written at another time, is still helpful and telling for our time today.

    6. Daniel

      When conjuring up an image of God, most of us will default to a white-bearded Charlton Heston à la Creation of Adam. How, then, does a person of colour process the claim that he or she is made in the image of God? Add centuries of slavery and unrestrained racism to the mix, and it becomes obvious why there might be some problem with asking the black community to accept a white theology. A euro-centric gospel is a poorly-fitted garment which is ill-suited to the need.I don't know how relevant th [...]

    7. Deb

      This book was an interesting read. It was written in 1967, after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. What I found most interesting about this book, was the ability to take the author's philosophy in the context of the time it was written, but to also take it in the context of today. I often found myself thinking that I could understand the point of view back in the height of the Civil Rights Movement, but not in the context of today. Over all, I strongly agreed with the premises presente [...]

    8. Liam

      "To be human is to find something worth dying for. When the black man rebels at the risk of death, he forces white society to look at him, to recognize him, to take his being into account, to admit that he is." (8)"To love the white man means that the black man confronts him as a Thou without any intentions of giving ground by becoming an It." (53)"The real test of whether whites can communicate with blacks as human beings is not what they rely to Ralph Bunche but how they reply to Rap Brown." ( [...]

    9. Freddie

      I'm on the last chapter, but so far the book is solid in its justification for a black theology that is totally dependent on the ideas and experiences of black people. It rallies around the concept of self-determination-the very essence of Black Power. He speaks plainly on the failures of white American Christianity to reconcile the humanity of black people and the failures of the black church to take seriously its self-sacrificial role in the lives of black people. [The black church being escha [...]

    10. Tyler Proctor

      Cone is more sympathetic to the use of violence/force to achieve goals than I am, but I respect his reasoning more than any other Christian thinker I've encountered that justifies violence (not mislead anyone into the misconception that Black Power is an inherently violent movement). Regardless, that is my only problem with this book. It is overall and engaging, relevant, and eye opening work that makes the case for the prophetic Christian roots of a movement centered on an oppressed group of pe [...]

    11. Robert Fischer

      I read this book for my "Theology in the Black Church Traditions" class. It was an extremely challenging read and made me think differently about the role of theology — how theology can be expressly political. It also helped me understand the 1960s/1970s radical black power movement, which always seemed utterly foreign to me. Overall, though, the text is so contextual and of-its-time that I would not recommend it as a read for most people. And if you're the kind of person who would benefit fro [...]

    12. Marty Tormoe Yo

      I picked this up because of the presidential campaigns in 2008. Rev. James Wright cited James H. Cone on several occasions, and I wanted to see what the source had to say rather than popular media.I think he is about 50% in line with Martin Luther King. I believe that MLK and James Cone part company with the concept of "at all costs". They both believed in Black liberation, but their means are not the same; hence the title of the book is black power.I'm all for equality for everyone, but power i [...]

    13. Sean Muldowney

      Written in 1969 and updated in 1989, this book has stood the test of time and is proving to be a prophetic description of the racial injustices occurring today, most notably in Ferguson. As a white evangelical minister, I commend this book to everyone, and especially to my white friends as we desperately need to embrace a posture of listening and non-defensiveness towards Black suffering.

    14. Philip Yoder

      wow, in my search for real neo-anabaptism, Cone seems to provide it in this book. it was hard to read, but I think speaks true to what the church needs to become, and the self that it needs to reject. if anyone wants to stick it out with Christianity, I think here in lies a chunk of where is needs to go in the 21st century. incredible read.

    15. Austin Sill

      "Therefore, God's Word of reconciliation means that we can only be justified by becoming black To be black means that your heart, your soul, your mind, and your body are where the dispossessed are."Read it. Everyone. Still immensely relevant and indispensably important.

    16. Izaiah Dawkins

      Dr.Cone is my favorite author for a reason. His historic understanding of theology is amazing . He leads the reader to believe that theology is about the struggle of slavery . I love it ,Dr. Cone is a master-mind .

    17. Ferrell Foster

      This is an amazing book. It is dated now, but it gives anyone interested in the civil rights movement, racism, theology, or justice much to think about.

    18. Charles

      Didn't enjoy it as much as God of the Oppressed. But the language he uses in this book is interesting a turning-on-its-head of the white supremicism found in theology.

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