House of Lords and Commons: Poems

House of Lords and Commons Poems A stunning collection that traverses the borders of culture and time from the winner of the PEN Joyce Osterweil AwardIn House of Lords and Commons the revelatory and vital new collection of poe

  • Title: House of Lords and Commons: Poems
  • Author: Ishion Hutchinson
  • ISBN: 9780374173029
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Hardcover
  • House of Lords and Commons: Poems

    A stunning collection that traverses the borders of culture and time, from the 2011 winner of the PEN Joyce Osterweil AwardIn House of Lords and Commons, the revelatory and vital new collection of poems from the winner of the 2013 Whiting Writers Award in poetry, Ishion Hutchinson returns to the difficult beauty of the Jamaican landscape with remarkable lyric precision HA stunning collection that traverses the borders of culture and time, from the 2011 winner of the PEN Joyce Osterweil AwardIn House of Lords and Commons, the revelatory and vital new collection of poems from the winner of the 2013 Whiting Writers Award in poetry, Ishion Hutchinson returns to the difficult beauty of the Jamaican landscape with remarkable lyric precision Here, the poet holds his world in full focus but at an astonishing angle from the violence of the seventeenth century English Civil War as refracted through a mythic sea wanderer, right down to the dark interior of love.These poems arrange the contemporary continuum of home and abroad into a wonderment of cracked narrative sequences and tumultuous personae With ears tuned to the vernacular, the collection vividly binds us to what is terrifying about happiness, loss, and the lure of the sea House of Lords and Commons testifies to the particular courage it takes to wade unsettled, uncertain, and unfettered in the wake of our shared human experience.

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      299 Ishion Hutchinson
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      Posted by:Ishion Hutchinson
      Published :2020-07-04T20:30:34+00:00

    One thought on “House of Lords and Commons: Poems

    1. Roxane

      I can tell this is excellent and brilliantly composed poetry but I simply didn't connect to the work. I didn't feel smart enough to understand any of the poems.

    2. Roger DeBlanck

      For a volume that demands multiple readings and much patience to absorb, Hutchinson's oftentimes abstruse poems, nonetheless, compulsively draw you back to the challenge of understanding their complexity. His verses are densely constructed with rich and beautiful language, and when you begin to piece together the puzzle of his vision, the message can be both endearing and haunting. At their core, many of the poems attest to anguish from Hutchinson's personal past and over the condition of his ho [...]

    3. Pamela Laskin

      Just finished reading wonderful poetry book, HOUSE OF LORDS AND COMMONS by Ishion Hutchinson, born in Jamaica, and an assistant professor at Cornell University. Talk about language that slices through the skin; his diction is stark, challenging, dark, haunting, lyrical, and lovely. I love his rage against politics, his poignant understanding of tenderness and fatherhood. There is wonderful irony and edgy violence, but his authenticity makes this an amazingly beautiful book. A must read!

    4. Rick

      This is Hutchinson’s second collection. I will be right back. Have to go get his first collection, Far District, because this is one talented young poet. (Back. Got it.) Hutchinson is Jamaica born and raised but a resident of the United States since 2006. House of Lords and Commons deservedly won the National Book Critics award for poetry in a year when great poetry seems to be as ample as apples in a blessed autumn harvest. (When you compare short lists of those who give out national poetry p [...]

    5. Kelly

      The March Lesson of the day: Syria and Styria.For Syria, read: His conquering banner shook from Syria.And for Styria: Look at this harp of  blood, mapping.Now I am tuned. I am going to go abovemy voice for the sake of the forest shakenon the bitumen. You can see stars in the skulls,winking, synapses, intermittent, on edgeof shriek — perhaps a cluster of fir, birches? — Anyways. Don’t get too hung upon the terms; they have entropyin common, bad for the public weal,those obtuse cen [...]

    6. Craig Werner

      There's enough here to keep me interested in Hutchinson's development, but the collection didn't quite come together for me. There are echoes of many other Caribbean writers--the contrast between the tropics and the US North that extends back at least to Claude McKay--the sense of a conflicted history embedded in family relationships. Hutchinson mixes in some interesting cross-references between the European-American and Afro-Caribbean traditions, notably in "Sibelius and Marley." Both "After th [...]

    7. Brian

      It is difficult to summarize all that Ishion Hutchinson reveals and draws out of you as a reader. While much of this volume conjures Jamaica and British history, there are brilliant excursions such as:"That red bicycle left in an alley near the Ponte Vecchio,/ I claim; I claim its elongated shadow, ship crested on/ stacked crates; I claim the sour-mouth Arno and the stone/ arch bending sunlight on vanished medieval fairs;/ but mostly I claim this two-wheel chariot vetching/ on the wall, its sick [...]

    8. Andy Oram

      For these poems, the author painstakingly assembled memories of places he has grown up, lived in, and traveled to, along with acerbic political and social observations and incredibly rich metaphor. "Don't get too hung up on the terms," as he says in "A March." I didn't untangle every phrase, but I found much of the book moving, and had to sit quietly for a while after the end. Most effective to me was a poem late in the book where Hutchinson softens his modernist style for a more prose-poem appr [...]

    9. Laura Frey (Reading in Bed)

      I first read Hutchinson in The Happy Reader. His essay about reading Treasure Island as a child (on an island) was beautiful. Then I heard him read from this book on the Shakespeare and Company podcast. Then I read this. I think if I'd come to the book without that preparation, it wouldn't have made such an impression. Poetry is meant to be listened to, I'm convinced!

    10. Kyle Williams

      a voice withoutforce to crack the terra-cotta quiet, steadilyerect between two flailing lives; memoryand this, the present, advancing only down--There's some good stuff in this collection, drowning in everything else.

    11. John

      Borderline impenetrable. I could get glimpses, but the larger structures usually escaped me. When I got to The Ark, I went back and started fresh as I think that was the easiest to lock in to, the entry point for hearing him in his expressive mode.

    12. Shanique Edwards

      One of the more dense poetry collections I've read. I'd appreciate the mastery of Hutchinson's poetry much more if I could place the numerous literary/classics references in the poems. I kept getting the sense that I was reading something rich and beautiful, but I couldn't quite grasp it.

    13. Douglas

      Hutchinson's lyrics seemed dissonant to me. I couldn't pick up the flow or the music. I'll have to give his work another try.

    14. Mike Hammer

      A lyrical collection of superb words and good rhythms, but the poems are a bit dense at points and not as straightforward as they could be. Some good lines and feelings tho.

    15. Tracy

      Notes from my phone:-vivid history-Hutchinson puts the reader in context, in action, with his words-like Tracy K. Smith and Peter Balakian: knowledge of history and poetic form"I continued: for immorality." (12)

    16. Laura

      Perhaps it's not suited to my palate; the language, while visceral in choice, was too clouded by metaphors for me to understand.

    17. Brendan

      Favorites:"Fitzy and the Revolution""The Night Autobiographies of Leopold Dice"women sizzle like seltzer and bellsstriking noon on terraces.- "After Pompeii"

    18. Robin

      Overall, I didn't quite connect with this collection. The skill in the craft and language is indisputable. However, I don't think I was the intended audience.

    19. Sharon

      This was quite a good collection of poems; a bit on the heavy side - definitely not light and fluffy, but extremely goodis was a giveaway

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