Desire: Poems

Desire Poems Nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry I hate and love The sleepless body hammering a nail nails itself hanging crucified from Catullus Excrucior In Frank Bidart s collection

  • Title: Desire: Poems
  • Author: Frank Bidart
  • ISBN: 9780374525996
  • Page: 109
  • Format: Paperback
  • Desire: Poems

    Nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry.I hate and love The sleepless body hammering a nail nails itself, hanging crucified from Catullus Excrucior In Frank Bidart s collection of poems, the encounter with desire is the encounter with destiny The first half contains some of Bidart s most luminous and intimate work poems about the art of writNominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry.I hate and love The sleepless body hammering a nail nails itself, hanging crucified from Catullus Excrucior In Frank Bidart s collection of poems, the encounter with desire is the encounter with destiny The first half contains some of Bidart s most luminous and intimate work poems about the art of writing, Eros, and the desolations and mirror of history in a spectacular narrative based on Tacitus The second half of the book exts the overt lyricism of the opening section into even ambitious territory The Second Hour of the Night may be Bidart s most profound and complex meditation on the illusion of will, his most seductive dramatic poem to date.Desire is a 1997 National Book Award Finalist for Poetry.

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    One thought on “Desire: Poems

    1. Gus

      He is the best at channeling the voices of the dead. For example:Lady BirdNeither an invalid aunt who had been asked to care for a sister's/ little girl, to fill the dead sister's place, nor the child herself// did, could: not in my Daddy's eyes--nor/ should they;// so when we followed that golden couple into the White House// I was aware that people look at/ the living, and wish for the dead.

    2. Jaredjosephjaredjoseph harveyharvey

      Each of them knows what will happen here:–. . . she can delay, he can delaybecause what is sweet aboutdeferral is that what arrivesdespite it, is revealed as inevitable:–

    3. Weston Richey

      So I mean I read it in 45 minutes before going to class, if that's any indication that it is, in fact very good (and short!)I give it 4 stars instead of 5 because Part II, which consists entirely of one 32 page poem, had me a little bit lost at times—just kind of swallowed up by the massive poem in a not-great way. Then again, this is oftentimes what it's like to read Bidart's longer pieces.That said though, this collection's first part, a bunch of shorter poems, is extremely touching and bord [...]

    4. Fungus Gnat

      This is Bidart’s 5th book of poems, counting as 4th a “collected” summation. The book is divided into two parts, the first a series of 13 pieces ranging from less than half a page to five pages in length, the second consisting of a single 33-page poem entitled “The Second Hour of the Night.” This is the first of Bidart’s books I’ve read, which is one more than I have read of almost every other living poet, so that gives you some idea how little attention you should pay to what I ha [...]

    5. Sienna

      This is an extraordinary meditation on well, desire. Love, lust, longing, the complications that accompany that which we cannot control or change. Love of love as much as love of the beloved. The desire to want something else, to be someone else. After reading the first half of the book, I described Bidart's work to a friend as sparse and powerful. He uses the spaces between words, the ideas connecting and inhabiting them, deftly, building and repeating in an almost musical way."The Return," a p [...]

    6. Rui Carlos da Cunha

      The book is mostly amazing for the poem, "The Second Hour of the Night" which is 33 pages of sheer brilliance. In the first 21 pages, there is a poem, "The Return" that foreshadows the level of aesthetic quality that approaches in the latter half of the book, but the poem "Borges and I" is a silly imitation of the Argentinian master. The two "halves" of the book are so dissimilar that only the usage of "pre-existing forms" that are liberally scattered throughout allows for a coherence between th [...]

    7. Kent

      The concept I see Bidart describing in this book is difficult to articulate, which is one the things that pulls me into the book. In some way, Bidart wants to show how desire can actually begin to feel like a concrete object, or a body, that is independent of our physical bodies. And this desire takes on a life, poses demands, and compels us to people or ideas we wouldn't normally consider. The central poem of the book, "The Second Hour of the Night" tells the myth of Myrrha, and her adolescent [...]

    8. Abby

      Bidart's work does sometimes require some code-breaking, which may account for some people's ho-hum reaction. You often have to work to be wowed. But the work can pay off. The longer poems in particular have a density more commonly found in prose, but their lyricism is so weirdly effectively that you sometimes understand without understanding how.That said, I found Desire to be less ecstatic and more labored than his more recent collection, Stardust. I would send skeptics in that direction.

    9. A

      There is so much here that I normally abhor about poetry and while not my taste, this work succeeds in almost every way. From the ruminations on myth, history and desire to the sleepless epitaphs, Bidart comments while revivifying the dead. The haunting end is fitting for desire: sometimes what we want is not what we get even if in some peculiar way it is both ourselves and something we have made. Read this because the lines cut deep.

    10. Ben G

      A bit unfair to call a 1997 book dated, I know. This is dude-poetry, largely tied to classics allusions in a prosey narrative form. This style was big when I was in grad school, but it's indulgent and archaic today. 2.5 stars, but dude-me would have given it 4 when I was in graduate school. Also, nice to see his work has changed with the poetic times - I liked 2013's METAPHYSICAL DOG quite a bit.

    11. Christina Rau

      The book was interesting and worth the wait. It was about all different kinds of desire in war, in lust, and I suppose love. It was poetic. It was mythological. It was a story not in prose but in something that played on the page. I read it in half an hour. It was short.

    12. Eliza T. Williamson

      Bidart created a gritty, touching and at times surprising collection of poems. It was a pleasure to see "fuck" used in a poem and have it work.

    13. Gerbik

      I was given this one back in college and have read it a few times - everything except "The Second Hour of the Night." I plan to read that long poem soon.

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